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    Irish Apple Fritters

    5 oz. flour
    5 fluid oz. water
    1/4 tsp. salt
    2 eggs (separated)
    1 Tbsp. melted butter
    2 large cooking apples
    4 oz. confectioner's sugar
    lemon juice
    oil for deep frying

    Make batter at least an hour before required, using the following method: Sift together flour and salt. Make a well in the center, add the cooled melted butter and some of the water and egg yolks. Work in the flour and beat until smooth. Add remaining water. Leave to stand. Just before using, beat the egg whites until stiff, but not dry. Fold into batter mix. Peel, core and slice apples (make slices about 1/4 – 1/2" thick). Dip into batter and deep fry in very hot oil (175°-180° C) until golden. Drain and serve drenched with confectioner's sugar and sprinkled with lemon juice.

    Stuffed Cabbage

    1 large head of cabbage
    1 Tbsp. margarine
    2 medium onions, sliced
    1 lb. lean ground beef
    4 Tbsp. grated onions
    3 Tbsp. uncooked rice
    1 tsp. salt
    1/8 tsp. pepper
    8 oz. can tomato sauce
    1 cup water
    1/4 cup seedless raisins
    3 Tbsp. honey (or brown sugar)
    1 Tbsp. lemon juice

    Trim off thick parts of 18 cabbage leaves. Blanch in boiling water. Melt margarine in deep, heavy saucepan. Add sliced onions, and lightly brown. Mix together beef, grated onions, uncooked rice, 3 Tbsp. water, 1 1/2 tsp. salt and the pepper. Place some meat on each cabbage leaf, tuck in sides and roll cabbage. Add tomato sauce, 1 cup water and 1 1/2 tsp. salt to sliced onions. Place cabbage rolls in saucepan, cover and cook slowly for 1 1/2 hours. Add raisins, honey or brown sugar and lemon juice. Cook uncovered 30 minutes. Serve in soup bowls.

    Hallowmass Cakes

    1/2 cup vegetable oil
    4 oz. unsweetened baking chocolate, melted
    2 cups granulated sugar
    4 eggs
    2 tsp. vanilla
    2 cups cake flour, sifted
    2 tsp. baking powder
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1 cup confectioner's sugar

    In a mixing bowl, combine vegetable oil, chocolate, and granulated sugar. Blend in eggs, one at a time, stirring well after each addition. Add vanilla. Stir in flour, baking powder, and salt into oil mixture. Chill for several hours or overnight.

    Preheat oven to 350° F. Roll about a Tbsp. of dough into a ball. Drop balls into confectioner's sugar, and roll until coated. Place balls about 2" apart on a greased baking sheet. Bake for 10-12 minutes. The cakes should be soft and the edges firm. Do not over bake; they burn easily. Makes about 3 doz.

    Hot Apple Cider

    1 1/2 gallons apple cider
    2 whole cinnamon sticks
    5 cloves
    1 large orange, sliced thin with peel left on
    1/2 lemon, sliced thin with peel left on
    1/2 cup sugar

    In large pot, combine cider, cinnamon sticks, orange and lemon slices. Add sugar to taste. Heat thoroughly. Serve hot.

    Colcannon

    4 medium potatoes, peeled and boiled
    3 Tbsp. butter
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1/8 tsp. black pepper
    1/4 cup milk
    2 Tbsp. sour cream
    8 oz. kale, steamed and chopped
    1 Tbsp. onion, grated

    Mash potatoes with butter, salt, pepper, milk and sour cream until light and fluffy. Stir in kale and grated onion. Serve at once.

    Irish Holiday Potatoes

    12 medium potatoes; peeled, cooked & mashed
    2 eggs; well beaten
    8 oz. cream cheese, softened
    1 tsp. salt
    1/4 cup butter
    pepper
    1/2 cup sour cream
    1/4 cup sliced green onions
    1/2 cup milk

    Mix potatoes with remaining ingredients. Mix well, but lightly; do not whip! Place in a greased 9" round casserole dish and bake in a preheated 350° oven for 45 minutes.

    Pumpkin Bread

    2/3 cup shortening
    1 tsp. nutmeg
    2 2/3 cups sugar
    1 tsp. cinnamon
    4 large eggs
    2 tsp. baking soda
    1 tsp. vanilla
    1/2 tsp. baking powder
    3 1/3 cups flour
    2/3 cup water
    1 can Pumpkin
    1/2 tsp. salt

    Mix all the above ingredients together, pour into 2 loaf pans. Bake at 350° for 50-60 minutes. You can add dates and nuts if you like.

    Pumpkin Pie Ice Cream with Caramel Sauce

    Crust:
    1 1/2 cups crushed gingersnaps (approximately 30 cookies)
    1/4 cup melted butter

    Filling:
    1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
    1 pint vanilla ice cream
    3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
    1/2 tsp. ground ginger
    1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp. ground cloves
    1 cup fresh or canned pumpkin
    1 cup heavy whipping cream- whipped

    Sauce:
    1 cup caramel ice cream topping
    1/2 cup chopped pecans

    In small bowl, combine crushed gingersnaps and butter; blend well. Press firmly in bottom and up sides of 9" pie plate. Refrigerate 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, in large bowl, stir 1/2 tsp. cinnamon into ice cream. Spoon into crust. Freeze.

    In medium bowl, combine brown sugar, ginger, cinnamon, cloves, and pumpkin; blend well. Fold in whipped cream. Spoon over ice cream in crust. Freeze 3 hours until firm. Let stand at room temperature 15-20 minutes before serving.

    In small saucepan, combine caramel topping and nuts. Stir constantly until heated through. Serve warm over pie.

    Roast Loin of Pork

    1 pork loin
    1 small onion, chopped
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 Tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
    1/2 bay leaf; crushed
    1/2 tsp. celery seeds
    1//2 tsp. dry thyme
    4 whole cloves
    1 tsp. beef bouillon
    salt & pepper to taste

    Fold 2 large sheets of aluminum foil together with a double fold. There should be enough to enclose the roast. Place roast on foil. Stick cloves into loin and sprinkle other ingredients over top. Enclose roast tightly in foil and cook in 300° oven for approximately 45 minutes per pound of roast.

    Pice Bach (Welsh Cakes)

    1 lb. plain flour
    1 tsp. baking powder
    1 tsp. mixed spice
    4 oz. margarine
    4 oz. shortening
    6 oz. caster sugar
    4 oz. currants
    2 eggs
    milk

    Sift the flour, baking powder, and mixed spice; rub in the margarine and shortening; add the sugar, currants and beaten egg. Mix in milk to make a stiff dough on a hot griddle until golden brown, about 4 minutes on each side.

    Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies

    1 1/2 cup softened butter
    1 cup brown sugar or 1/2 cup honey
    2 eggs
    1 tsp vanilla
    1 cup pureed pumpkin
    1 1/2 cups flour
    1 1/2 cups oatmeal (grind rolled oats in a blender, but not into a flour)
    1/2 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 tsp cinnamon
    1/4 tsp nutmeg
    1/4 tsp cloves
    1/2 cup raisins
    1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

    Cream together butter and sugar (or honey). Beat in eggs. Mix in pumpkin and vanilla. In a separate bowl, mix together flour, oatmeal, salt, soda, and spices. Add to the pumpkin mixture. Stir in raisins and nuts. Drop by teaspoonful onto a baking sheet and bake at 375° for 12 minutes.

    Candied Apples

    12 apples
    3 Cups sugar
    1 cup light corn syrup
    1 1/2 cups water
    1 1/2 tsp. red food coloring
    12 Popsicle sticks
    1 cup medium peanuts, optional

    Combine sugar, syrup, water and food coloring in a sauce pan. Cook over medium heat until the mixture looks like wet cracks (8 to 10 minutes). Turn heat to low. Stick a Popsicle stick into each apple (at the stem), and dip each apple into the sauce pan. Roll in peanuts and place apples on waxed paper to cool and harden.

    Pumpkin Bars

    2 cups sifted flour
    2 tsp. Baking powder
    2 tsp. cinnamon
    1 tsp. baking soda
    4 eggs
    2 cups canned pumpkin
    1 2/3 cups sugar
    1 cup vegetable oil
    1 cup chopped pecans

    Mix together oil, sugar and eggs. Add the pumpkin and mix well. Sift together all the dry ingredients. Add part of the dry ingredients to the oil mixture, and then slowly add the rest of the dry ingredients and stir until just moistened. Spread in a 15"x10"x1" pan. Bake at 350° for 25-30.

    Cream Cheese Frosting

    3 oz. Cream Cheese
    1/4 cup butter
    2 cups sifted powdered sugar

    Beat all the ingredients together until smooth, frost the baked and cooled pumpkin mixture, and then cut into bars.

    http://www.angelfire.com/wa3/angelline/samhain_recipes.htm
    Any photos, artwork or graphics not credited, the copyright remains with their respective owner and any modifications made are for entertainment purposes only and no infringement is intended. The copyrights added to them are for the written work.

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    love it! ~Aranwen~
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    ♥ ~Jasmine
  • October 23 – eighth of the month of Pyanepsion

    today is the Oscophoria – a fes…

    October 23 – eighth of the month of Pyanepsion

    today is the Oscophoria – a festival celebrated as an expression of gratitude to Athena and Dionysos who both appeared to Theseus on the island of Dia

    and as today is alos the eighth of the lunar month, today is also a holy time for Poseidon, Asklepios and Theseus

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    Rituals, Festivals and Ceremonies
    The Oschophoria

    It was said that Theseus originated the Oschophoric rite on the eighth of Pyanepsion, as an expression of gratitude to Athena and Dionysos who both appeared to him on the island of Dia. Oschophoric songs were sung by the Athenians and the chorus was led by two youths dressed as women and carrying a vine branch covered with healthy bunches of grapes (the osche) as the ship bearing the twice seven to Crete and back home consisted of seven youths, five maidens, and two youths dressed as maidens. The procession went from the Dionysiac shrine to the precinct of Athena Skiras at the Phaleron next to the precinct of the Oschophorion. There were ‘dinner bearers’ bringing the feast and loaves of bread to the Phaleron in remembrance of the youths and maidens who were locked up before being sent to the Minotaur and were given food and told stories by their mothers to ease their fears. The priestesses of Aglauros an Athena Skiras and the priest of Herakles and other officiants were recipients of the loaves. It is likely, as Parker has argued, that the deipnophoria (dinner-bringing) for Aglauros, Pandrosos, and Herse was part of the Oschophoria. Ephebes from each tribe competed in a race. (See Robert Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens, Oxford 2005, pp. 211-217.)

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    Witchcraft, Living The Old Religion
    SAMHAIN Samhain is popularly known today as Halloween, a contraction of the words "Hallowed Evening", and it retains much of the original form and meaning it had long ago in Celtic lands, despite the efforts of the Church to turn it into an observance of feasting and prayer for their vast pantheon of saints. The Church began calling it Michaelmas, the feast day of St. Michael, but the old Samhain holiday proved to be too potent a drawing card for one lone saint to combat. So it was renamed the Eve of All Saints, or All Hallows Eve, which precedes All Saint's Day, and is still one of the holiest days in Catholicism. The pagan Samhain is not, and never was, associated with evil or negativity. It has always been a time to reaffirm our belief in the oneness of all spirits, and in our firm resolution that physical death is not the final act of existence. Though death is very much a part of Samhain's symbolism, this Sabbat also celebrates the triumph of life over death. While it is true that Samhain is no more evil than any other holiday, it is also a fact that evil does exist, and pagans have always been aware of this. Our ancestors sought to protect themselves on this night by carving faces in vegetables to place near windows or at the perimeters of their circle. These were the forerunners of our present day jack-o-lanterns. These carved pumpkin faces are probably relics of the even earlier custom of placing candles in windows to guide the earth-walking spirits along their way. Today it is still a custom in Ireland to place candles in the windows on Samhain night and to leave plates of food for the visiting spirits. There are two possible sources for the origin of the Samhain Sabbat's name. One is from the Aryan God of Death, Samana, and the other is from the Irish Gaelic word "samhraidhreadh", which literally means "the summer's end". Samhain marked the end of summer and the beginning of winter for the Celts, with the day after Samhain being the official date of the Celtic New Year. The reason the Celts chose this point in time as their new year rather than Yule, when the rest of Western pagans celebrate it, was because the sun is at its lowest point on the horizon as measured by the ancient standing stones of Britain and Ireland. This is also a time for harmless pranks, lavish feasting, circle games, and merrymaking which can be teasingly blamed on nearby spirits icon wink Our Facebook RSS (ala Loki, Abbot, Lord of Misrule etc.) Samhain bonfires, called balefires in paganism, were once lighted on every hilltop in Britain and Ireland as soon as the sun set on October 30. The word "balefire" comes from the word "boon", which means "extra". The fires serve the purpose of containing the energy of the dead god, lighting the dark night, warding off evil, ushering in the light of the New Year, purifying the ritual space or home, and being the focus of ritual. In many parts of the British Isles these balefires are still lighted on Samhain to honor the old ways. The idea that evil spirits walk the earth at Samhain is a misinterpretation of the pagan belief that the veil of consciousness which separates the land of the living from the land of the dead is at its thinnest on this night. This does not mean that hordes of evil entities cross this chasm. Some pagans believe this veil is made thin by the God's passing through it into the Land of the Dead, and that he will, for the sake of his people, attempt to hold back any spirits crossing into the physical plane whose intent it is to make trouble. In nearly all the Western pagan traditions, deceased ancestors and other friendly spirits are invited to join the Sabbat festivities, and be reunited with loved ones who are otherwise separated by time and dimensions of existence. Some modern scholars claim that Samhain's traditional 'trick or treat' custom was derived from a ploy to to scare away fairies and other mischievous spirits, but it has overtones of being a custom of a much later period, perhaps one which grew up around the Burning Times. During the Burning Times, masking and dark clothing hid the identities of witches going to their covens so that they might escape detection. The mask also had the added benefit of frightening away any inquisitor who might happen upon a lone figure in the woods. ~WITCHWAY.NET~

  • How To Make Rose Water (And Lavender Too)

    Rose water (also spelled Rosewater) c…

    How To Make Rose Water (And Lavender Too)

    Rose water (also spelled Rosewater) can be used in cooking as well as a rich beauty aid. Try some as a facial toner or astringent, in your bath or as a facial splash (refresher).

    otes on Preparation:

    Petals must be freshly picked and have no pesticides or chemicals used on them.
    Pick the flowers just after the morning dew has evaporated, about 2 to 3 hours after sunrise.
    Use only the petals, not the stems or leaves.
    Wash quickly to remove any bugs or specks of dirt and immediately process with one of the methods below.
    If you don’t grow your own, ask at the local florist or Farmers Market for organic ones.

    Distilled:
    (Rose Hydrosol)

    Items Needed:

    Fresh petals (3 to 4 quarts)
    Ice cubes
    Distilled Water
    Enamel canning or stock pot with lid
    Deep, heavy heat proof bowl

    Directions:

    Fill the bottom of the pot with the petals and pour water over them until they are just covered. Place the bowl in the middle of the pot. The rim should be at least a couple inches higher than the water. If you have a canning rack, you can set the bowl on top of that so the bowl doesn’t sit directly over the heat. A pyrex loaf dish underneath the bowl would do the trick too. Set these in place first before adding the petals and water.
    Cover the pot with its lid, but position the lid upside down so that you have a dipped “container” to hold the ice on top (to be added later). Now turn on the heat and bring the water to a boil.
    Once it starts boiling, fill the top of the inverted pot lid with ice cubes. Turn the heat down and keep at a bare simmer for about two hours.
    Top up the ice as needed and quickly peek occasionally to see that the petals don’t boil dry.

    This process will enable condensation to form on the top inside of the pot lid. The condensation will drip down into the bowl inside the pot, the liquid inside the bowl is your rose water.

    Old Fashioned Recipe:

    Items Needed:

    Rose Petals
    Distilled Water
    Enamel Pot (any size)

    Directions:

    Fill the bottom of an enamel pot with the petals a few inches deep. Pour distilled water over them until they are just covered.
    Turn on heat for the water to be steaming hot, but do not boil. Let steam until the petals have lost their color, the water has taken on the color of the petals and you see oil skimming the surface. This will take approximately 60 minutes.
    Strain the water and squeeze out the liquid from the petals, this is your rosewater.

    Quick & Easy Version:

    For every 1 firmly packed cup of petals, pour 2 cups boiling water over top. Cover and steep until the liquid is cool. Strain, squeeze out the liquid from the petals, and refrigerate the liquid in a sterilized jar.

    Oven Method:

    Preheat oven to 450°. Line an enamelware roaster a few inches deep with petals. Fill with distilled water until the petals are just covered. Place the roaster uncovered into the oven and bring to a boil.
    As soon as it starts boiling, turn off the heat and cover the roaster. Leave in the oven until the water is cool (several hours). Once cool, strain and squeeze all the petals to remove the liquid. Store the liquid in the refrigerator.

    Notes:

    After preparing your recipe of choice, refrigerate in a sealed, sterilized glass jar.
    You can use for cooking and baking, but make sure to use fresh batches. Although it’s kept refrigerated, my notes have vast discrepancies in shelf life. Some state several days, some say a year.

    Beauty Aid Additive Use:

    Add 1 part rubbing alcohol or vodka or witch hazel to 10 parts rose water to use as a facial astringent or toner.

    Lavender

    Lavender water can be used in a variety of ways around the house. Some ideas:

    When washing bedding and linens, add some to the rinse cycle. Your bedding will have a light lavender scent (it helps those with sleep problems).
    Use when ironing, spritz a bit on the items being pressed. Will add a nice scent to the garment.
    It can also be used as a beauty aid, try it as a skin freshener on hot summer days, a hair rinse, splash in the bath or dab around temples for headache relief.
    Insect repellent, try it for mosquito repellent use as well as a mosquito bite itch helper. Lavender deters flies and other insects too.

    First Recipe:

    Mason Jar
    Lavender Buds
    Vodka

    Directions:

    Fill the glass jar with lavender and cover completely with vodka. Seal jar.
    Place the jar in a sunny location for about 18 days, rotate and shake the jar each day–morning and night.
    After 18 days, strain the buds from the vodka and seal the liquid in a clean glass jar.
    Use as needed.

    Second:

    2 cups water (distilled)
    3 TBS vodka
    15 drops Lavender essential oil

    Directions:

    Mix the essential oil and vodka together then add water. Seal in a jar or bottle, keep in a dark place for 2 weeks before using.

    http://tipnut.com/how-to-make-rose-water-4-recipes/

    Brought to you By Silver Severn

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    ~Hecate's Book of Shadows~
    How To Make Rose Water (And Lavender Too)

    Rose water (also spelled Rosewater) can be used in cooking as well as a rich beauty aid. Try some as a facial toner or astringent, in your bath or as a facial splash (refresher).

    otes on Preparation:

    Petals must be freshly picked and have no pesticides or chemicals used on them.
    Pick the flowers just after the morning dew has evaporated, about 2 to 3 hours after sunrise.
    Use only the petals, not the stems or leaves.
    Wash quickly to remove any bugs or specks of dirt and immediately process with one of the methods below.
    If you don’t grow your own, ask at the local florist or Farmers Market for organic ones.

    Distilled:
    (Rose Hydrosol)

    Items Needed:

    Fresh petals (3 to 4 quarts)
    Ice cubes
    Distilled Water
    Enamel canning or stock pot with lid
    Deep, heavy heat proof bowl

    Directions:

    Fill the bottom of the pot with the petals and pour water over them until they are just covered. Place the bowl in the middle of the pot. The rim should be at least a couple inches higher than the water. If you have a canning rack, you can set the bowl on top of that so the bowl doesn’t sit directly over the heat. A pyrex loaf dish underneath the bowl would do the trick too. Set these in place first before adding the petals and water.
    Cover the pot with its lid, but position the lid upside down so that you have a dipped “container” to hold the ice on top (to be added later). Now turn on the heat and bring the water to a boil.
    Once it starts boiling, fill the top of the inverted pot lid with ice cubes. Turn the heat down and keep at a bare simmer for about two hours.
    Top up the ice as needed and quickly peek occasionally to see that the petals don’t boil dry.

    This process will enable condensation to form on the top inside of the pot lid. The condensation will drip down into the bowl inside the pot, the liquid inside the bowl is your rose water.

    Old Fashioned Recipe:

    Items Needed:

    Rose Petals
    Distilled Water
    Enamel Pot (any size)

    Directions:

    Fill the bottom of an enamel pot with the petals a few inches deep. Pour distilled water over them until they are just covered.
    Turn on heat for the water to be steaming hot, but do not boil. Let steam until the petals have lost their color, the water has taken on the color of the petals and you see oil skimming the surface. This will take approximately 60 minutes.
    Strain the water and squeeze out the liquid from the petals, this is your rosewater.

    Quick & Easy Version:

    For every 1 firmly packed cup of petals, pour 2 cups boiling water over top. Cover and steep until the liquid is cool. Strain, squeeze out the liquid from the petals, and refrigerate the liquid in a sterilized jar.

    Oven Method:

    Preheat oven to 450°. Line an enamelware roaster a few inches deep with petals. Fill with distilled water until the petals are just covered. Place the roaster uncovered into the oven and bring to a boil.
    As soon as it starts boiling, turn off the heat and cover the roaster. Leave in the oven until the water is cool (several hours). Once cool, strain and squeeze all the petals to remove the liquid. Store the liquid in the refrigerator.

    Notes:

    After preparing your recipe of choice, refrigerate in a sealed, sterilized glass jar.
    You can use for cooking and baking, but make sure to use fresh batches. Although it’s kept refrigerated, my notes have vast discrepancies in shelf life. Some state several days, some say a year.

    Beauty Aid Additive Use:

    Add 1 part rubbing alcohol or vodka or witch hazel to 10 parts rose water to use as a facial astringent or toner.

    Lavender

    Lavender water can be used in a variety of ways around the house. Some ideas:

    When washing bedding and linens, add some to the rinse cycle. Your bedding will have a light lavender scent (it helps those with sleep problems).
    Use when ironing, spritz a bit on the items being pressed. Will add a nice scent to the garment.
    It can also be used as a beauty aid, try it as a skin freshener on hot summer days, a hair rinse, splash in the bath or dab around temples for headache relief.
    Insect repellent, try it for mosquito repellent use as well as a mosquito bite itch helper. Lavender deters flies and other insects too.

    First Recipe:

    Mason Jar
    Lavender Buds
    Vodka

    Directions:

    Fill the glass jar with lavender and cover completely with vodka. Seal jar.
    Place the jar in a sunny location for about 18 days, rotate and shake the jar each day–morning and night.
    After 18 days, strain the buds from the vodka and seal the liquid in a clean glass jar.
    Use as needed.

    Second:

    2 cups water (distilled)
    3 TBS vodka
    15 drops Lavender essential oil

    Directions:

    Mix the essential oil and vodka together then add water. Seal in a jar or bottle, keep in a dark place for 2 weeks before using.

    http://tipnut.com/how-to-make-rose-water-4-recipes/

    Brought to you By Silver Severn
    Any photos, artwork or graphics not credited, the copyright remains with their respective owner and any modifications made are for entertainment purposes only and no infringement is intended. The copyrights added to them are for the written work.

  • Well it’s Tuesday! so early start for me and must say I can hear my bed calling…
    Well it’s Tuesday! so early start for me and must say I can hear my bed calling me back and the way I feel the bed may just win at least for an hour lol ironically being Tiw's (Tiu's) day I want to talk about helping hands something we are all capable of, when we give ourselves over to helping others without reward we grow now we often help without knowing a few coins in the charity box or help just out of kindness, popping to shop for a sick friend or keeping an eye on the elderly during cold weather (know some of you will be sitting reading this thinking I do that!!!!! Self-reward is still a reward in fact the reward that only helps the ego grow). But we help out of instinct as humans we may be the worst animals on this planet but we are the ones with the greatest potential so today may the gods help you reach or at least find the path that makes you the best you can be, Brightest Blessings Draco )o(/|\

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  • 9th Moon Day info:

    Symbols: Bat, Flying Moon.
    Characteristics: Day is critical…

    9th Moon Day info:

    Symbols: Bat, Flying Moon.
    Characteristics: Day is critical and dangerous. Day of nightmares, illusions, deceit, confusion, dark energies. It may lead to conflicts, arguments, nervousness. On the opposite, futile hope and belief in what's happening, temptation to see everything "rosy" may lead to future disappointments.

    Recommendations: Cleansing of thoughts, body and soul, active protection from aggression and negativity is necessary. Forgiveness of those who hurt us is very effective. It's important to learn to overcome temptations and obstacles of this day. Just like every moon day, this day has positive energies that can be used for spiritual growth. Wisdom perspective will help to find solutions in dead-end situations. Day is great for physical exercise and yoga.

    Precautions: Do not get caught today in illusions, empty dreams and desires. Family fights, skirmishes and scandals should be avoided. Making important decisions, and starting new business is not recommended.

  • Moon Day 9
    A day of struggle, the aggravation of conflicts, and heightened risk….

    Moon Day 9
    A day of struggle, the aggravation of conflicts, and heightened risk. Nothing new should be started on this day, especially if it is connected to material issues. The best things to do on this day are physical activities, such as working with land and taking care of plants and animals.
  • Tuesday — Tiu's day
    Middle English tiwesday or tewesday
    Old English tiwesdæg "T…

    Tuesday — Tiu's day
    Middle English tiwesday or tewesday
    Old English tiwesdæg "Tiw's (Tiu's) day"
    Latin dies Martis "day of Mars"
    Ancient Greek hemera Areos "day of Ares"

    Tiu (Twia) is the English/Germanic god of war and the sky. He is identified with the Norse god Tyr.

    Mars is the Roman god of war.

    Ares is the Greek god of war.

  • Sunrise: 7:47 AM BST
    Sunset: 6:00 PM BST
    Length of Day: 10h 13m
    Tomorrow wi…

    Sunrise: 7:47 AM BST
    Sunset: 6:00 PM BST
    Length of Day: 10h 13m
    Tomorrow will be 3m 39s shorter.
    Moon Rise: 3:11 PM BST
    Moon Set: 12:43 AM BST
    Moon Phase: Waxing Gibbous 62% Illuminated
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